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Pass The Mic: Tamir Rice Settlement

Comments (4)
  1. Art Denney says:

    As an old member (62 years old) member of the dominate culture, I do feel y’all are pro-black. BUT, I also realize y’all are not anti-white.

    While I do not agree with all I hear in each Podcast, I am slowly (painfully slowly) becoming aware of the privileges I have because I am a member of the dominate culture, and my responsibility to use my privileges to address social injustice.

    Continue preaching the WORD.

    Blessings.

  2. Tyler Burns says:

    Hi John,

    I greatly appreciate your comments and reply. We appreciate you following our website and listening to the podcast. Regardless of your thoughts or your opinions on these issues, we believe you should be heard and considered. I have a few responses here:

    1. We’ve discussed issues related to black crime pretty frequently and honestly. We just don’t talk about those realities in a vacuum. We don’t present these statistics as the end of the conversation. They are certainly lamentable, but there’s a history to these issues that can’t just be washed over in simple statements. Statements like this “The single greatest danger to young men like Tamir is NOT the police. It is other young black men” ring as more insensitive than compassionate to understand why these statistics exist rather than just what the statistics are. There are people, stories, neighborhoods, policies, and communities at the heart of these discussions.
    2. As far as I know, we don’t know how many deaths happen at the hands of police because there is no verifiable metric that tracks this nationwide. Can you point to a comprehensive list, because to my knowledge we don’t know enough to say that it is a “rare occurrence”?
    3. Protests about black crime happen all the time. I am sorry that you have not seen them, but they happen in many major American cities. While I can understand your frustration with BLM, in my city, the most recent demonstrations and protests on gun violence are being organized by BLM activists. They’ve asked many people to be involved. I wouldn’t mind sharing that when it happens just to show one small example of how often this is spoken about. Also, please understand that the black church as a mechanism speaks to these issues all the time, from the pulpit, with programs and outreaches and in the criminal justice system. Just because you haven’t heard it on the news doesn’t mean it’s not happening. Have you researched to see how many of these take place in major cities?
    4. I would be very careful with this paragraph: “In Cleveland, the home of Tamir Rice, in September 2015, three children under six years old were killed in drive by shootings. Have their deaths ever been lamented in RAAN articles and or podcasts? In Baltimore last year, ten children under ten years old were killed by gunfire in the inner city. Have their deaths ever been lamented by you”. Respectfully, I think we could say “____ was killed at the hands of the police in ____. Have you lamented their deaths or pledged to do something?” Such a statement would be unfair to you as a police officer in a specific community. Tamir’s story is an example of a nationwide concern, not a myopic glance at police brutality vs gang crime.
    5. Finally, I think your statement about NYC speaks to the different perspectives we have, which is fine. I respect you as a police officer and appreciate your service to your community. However, in the case of NYC, the “crime drop” that you referenced happened at the same time that police officers illegitimately search black and brown young men at alarming rates. They were most often not found to carry any drugs or illegal substances, but they were profiled and their dignity was assaulted. When we speak of a crime drop, it would probably be more effective to speak about situations that do not prey upon the dignity of others as a pretext for peaceful community. Because that allows the tension between law enforcement and certain communities to flourish.

    Those are just a few thoughts. Again, thanks for listening. We’re always eager to hear feedback. You can respond to this and we’ll continue talking as you feel comfortable.

    Grace and Peace,
    Tyler

  3. John N says:

    Well, you invited input from police officers, so here goes…

    First, I want to express my appreciation for RAAN. This may not be evident in my past comments, but I mean it. I am very thankful to see Reformed theology growing among black Christians. I am also sincerely thankful for prodding from RAAN articles and podcasts for me to consider your views which has led to me buying books from authors you have recommended in recent months. I have also listened to many lectures that you’ve recommended. I have largely been blessed by this effort and I’m “all in” with doing all I can to reconsider my own views in light of what I’m learning from you.

    The death of Tamir Rice is an unspeakable tragedy, which 6 million, or 6 trillion dollars will never begin to repay. I affirm your objections to the comments of Steve Loomis. They are degrading and an unfortunate.

    Jemar, you urged “majority culture” listeners to consider that we may not be as familiar as we need to be in order to understand the views expressed by RAAN. I admit this and I am committed, as I mentioned above, to learning. That’s why I’ve been following RAAN since August 2015. However, that advice is as true for you as it is for me. In my opinion, when it comes to speaking of the dynamic that exists between the black community and American law enforcement, I believe your ideas are lacking real engagement with the facts. Please don’t take that as a fork in the eye. You asked for the input.

    Lacking in your discussions of these issues is any sense of the reality that unless the egregiously disproportionate violent crime rates of the black community subside there will only be more tragedies like the one you discussed today. Cleveland, according to Forbes, is the ninth most dangerous city in the US and the danger is not white privilege, not racism of any sort. The single greatest danger to young men like Tamir is NOT the police. It is other young black men.

    Unjustified deaths of young black men at the hands of the police is a rare occurrance. That you speak of them as if it were the norm is at odds with reality and it is a detriment to the very people you say you want justice for.

    In Cleveland, the home of Tamir Rice, in September 2015, three children under six years old were killed in drive by shootings. Have their deaths ever been lamented in RAAN articles and or podcasts? In Baltimore last year, ten children under ten years old were killed by gunfire in the inner city. Have their deaths ever been lamented by you?

    There is no way forward unless black leaders in the church and the black community at large begin protesting at a volume that silences the false narrative that is being published today by the anti-cop left like Black Lives Matter, which is sadly echoed here all to often.

    In NYC, it was not mass conversions upon hearing the gospel that led to a thirty three percent drop in violent crime after the record highs of the nineties. It was a methodical police force with largely white visionaries leading it. You can also look at it as the result of God’s good providence in the means He has ordained in societies of all ages to suppress the lawless.

    I find much to disagree with in the writings of Jarvis Williams on the same issues. However, his article this past week (Family Worship…) is the much needed salve that black Christians and the whole world needs. Sit children down and teach them the law and the gospel. Pray for widespread revival.

    Thank you for reading to the end.

    John

    1. Tyler Burns says:

      Hi John,

      I greatly appreciate your comments and reply. We appreciate you following our website and listening to the podcast. Regardless of your thoughts or your opinions on these issues, we believe you should be heard and considered. I have a few responses here:

      1. We’ve discussed issues related to black crime pretty frequently and honestly. We just don’t talk about those realities in a vacuum. We don’t present these statistics as the end of the conversation. They are certainly lamentable, but there’s a history to these issues that can’t just be washed over in simple statements. Statements like this “The single greatest danger to young men like Tamir is NOT the police. It is other young black men” ring as more insensitive than compassionate to understand why these statistics exist rather than just what the statistics are. There are people, stories, neighborhoods, policies, and communities at the heart of these discussions.
      2. As far as I know, we don’t know how many deaths happen at the hands of police because there is no verifiable metric that tracks this nationwide. Can you point to a comprehensive list, because to my knowledge we don’t know enough to say that it is a “rare occurrence”?
      3. Protests about black crime happen all the time. I am sorry that you have not seen them, but they happen in many major American cities. While I can understand your frustration with BLM, in my city, the most recent demonstrations and protests on gun violence are being organized by BLM activists. They’ve asked many people to be involved. I wouldn’t mind sharing that when it happens just to show one small example of how often this is spoken about. Also, please understand that the black church as a mechanism speaks to these issues all the time, from the pulpit, with programs and outreaches and in the criminal justice system. Just because you haven’t heard it on the news doesn’t mean it’s not happening. Have you researched to see how many of these take place in major cities?
      4. I would be very careful with this paragraph: “In Cleveland, the home of Tamir Rice, in September 2015, three children under six years old were killed in drive by shootings. Have their deaths ever been lamented in RAAN articles and or podcasts? In Baltimore last year, ten children under ten years old were killed by gunfire in the inner city. Have their deaths ever been lamented by you”. Respectfully, I think we could say “____ was killed at the hands of the police in ____. Have you lamented their deaths or pledged to do something?” Such a statement would be unfair to you as a police officer in a specific community. Tamir’s story is an example of a nationwide concern, not a myopic glance at police brutality vs gang crime.
      5. Finally, I think your statement about NYC speaks to the different perspectives we have, which is fine. I respect you as a police officer and appreciate your service to your community. However, in the case of NYC, the “crime drop” that you referenced happened at the same time that police officers illegitimately search black and brown young men at alarming rates. They were most often not found to carry any drugs or illegal substances, but they were profiled and their dignity was assaulted. When we speak of a crime drop, it would probably be more effective to speak about situations that do not prey upon the dignity of others as a pretext for peaceful community. Because that allows the tension between law enforcement and certain communities to flourish.

      Those are just a few thoughts. Again, thanks for listening. We’re always eager to hear feedback. You can respond to this and we’ll continue talking as you feel comfortable.

      Grace and Peace,
      Tyler

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