We Persevere is a roundup of news regarding religious freedom and the persevering church at home and abroad. It is curated for RAANetwork by K.A. Ellis, Ambassador for International Christian Response.

PAKISTAN: A suicide attack on a hospital in Quetta, which killed at least 70 people and wounded more than 100, has renewed the debate over how the West mourns certain tragedies. As the West’s lack of response to the bombing was widely criticized across social media, many asked “Where are the hashtags for the Pakistan hospital attack?” Watch the video…

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO (DRC): At least 36 people were tied up and hacked to death in the North Kivu region on Saturday, the deadliest attack since November 2014. The jihadist organization: Islamist Allied Democratic Forces-National Association for the Liberation of Uganda (ADF-NALU) – seems to be rapidly gaining strength after persecution of Christians intensified last week. Some reports suggest the total casualties may be nearer to 50. The weekend’s killings are part of an ongoing resurgence in almost-weekly attacks, rapes, lootings and kidnappings in the DRC. Read more…

CHINA: For the past two years, the authorities of the Eastern Province of Zhejiang have been carrying out a campaign against the symbols and the Christian presence. The latest act involves hospitals, where today “all forms of religious activity are banned.” It is now forbidden to pray, preach, and receive priests or Protestant pastors at the bedside of the sick. Read more…

CHINA: “God let me live to witness and testify for him through writing. And for the 1.4 billion souls in my homeland, I shall continue. I do so in great hope. A growing faith in Christ, strengthened by the bonds of fellowship in church life, is breathing new life into my country. Neither the dead hand of Communism, nor the cynical imitation of Confucianism, nor capitalism, nor democracy, nor any earthly thing will determine the fate of my land. Christianity is China’s future.” So writes Yu Jie, a Chinese writer and dissident, in First Things magazine. Read the essay here…

INDONESIA: A group of believers was holding a meeting when about 20 radical Muslims interrupted. The Christians were told to disperse and never meet again, and threatened with machetes. Their pictures were taken for future intimidation. “Even though Christians enjoy protection constitutionally, on a local level, practically, they may not enjoy that because of radical elements that like to go from village to village and hunt down Christians.” Read more…

EGYPT: Christians staged a rare protest in downtown Cairo on Saturday to demand the government uphold their rights, saying they are being treated as second-class citizens in the Muslim-majority country. Some three dozen demonstrators braved Egypt’s protest ban to hold signs aloft, calling for their legal rights to be upheld in disputes between Muslims and Christians. Christians make up some ten percent of Egypt’s 91 million people. Read more…

UNITED STATES: With the highly disproportionate numbers of Syrian Christians being resettled into the United States, the U.S. State Department has received criticism from some news outlets that argue more Syrian Christians should be coming through the resettlement pipeline. However, the U.S. director of church mobilization for the evangelical refugee resettlement organization World Relief, one of nine organizations authorized to resettle refugees in the U.S., told The Christian Post in an interview last week that the State Department’s refugee resettlement program does not operate with a bias against Christian refugees. Read more…

UNITED STATES: As many continue to debate SB1146 in California, Alan Noble argues that “some conservative Christian colleges do not let young people engage in same-sex relationships. The government should keep allowing this, but schools also have an obligation to be more empathetic.” Read more…

Karen Ellis explores the zones where identity, human rights and theology intersect. She has performed, spoken and lectured internationally; in her twenty year career, she has been seen in classrooms, conferences, on radio, television, film and onstage. Karen holds a Master of Arts in Religion (Theological) from Westminster Theological Seminary, and a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale School of Drama. Karen travels and teaches alongside her husband, theological anthropologist Dr. Carl F. Ellis, Jr.